Publication

 
CodeMetropolis: Eclipse over the city of source code. Gergo Balogh, Attila Szabolics, and Arpad Beszedes. In Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM), 2015 IEEE 15th International Working Conference on, pages 271-276. IEEE, 2015. [ bib | .pdf ]
The graphical representations of software (code visualization in particular) may provide both professional programmers and students learning only the basics with support in program comprehension. Among the numerous proposed approaches, our research applies the city metaphor for the visualisation of such code elements as classes, functions, or attributes by the tool CodeMetropolis. It uses the game engine of Minecraft for the graphics, and is able to visualize various properties of the code based on structural metrics. In this work, we present our approach to integrate our visualization tool into the Eclipse IDE environment. Previously, only standalone usage was possible, but with this new version the users can invoke the visualization directly from the IDE, and all the analysis is performed in the background. The new version of the tool now includes an Eclipse plug-in and a Minecraft modification in addition to the analysis and visualization modules which have also been extended with some new features. Possible use cases and a detailed scenario are presented.

 
CodeMetropolis-code visualisation in MineCraft. Gergo Balogh and Arpad Beszedes. In Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM), 2013 IEEE 13th International Working Conference on, pages 136-141. IEEE, 2013. [ bib | .pdf ]
Data visualisation with high expressive power plays an important role in code comprehension. Recent visualization tools try to fulfil the expectations of the users and use various analogies. For example, in an architectural metaphor, each class is represented by a building. Buildings are grouped into districts according to the structure of the namespaces. We think that these unique ways of code representation have great potential, but in our opinion they use very simple graphical techniques (shapes, figures, low resolution) to visualize the structure of the source code.On the other hand, computer games use high quality graphic and good expressive power. A good example is Minecraft, a popular role playing game with great extensibility and interactivity from another (third party) software. It supports both high definition, photo-realistic textures and long range 3D scene displaying. Our main contribution is to connect data visualisation with high end-user graphics capabilities. To achieve this, a conversion tool was implemented. It processes the basic source code metrics as input and generates a Minecraft world with buildings, districts, and gardens. The tool is in the prototype state, but it can be used to investigate the possibilities of this kind of data visualisation.

 
CodeMetrpolis—A minecraft based collaboration tool for developers. Gergo Balogh and Arpád Beszédes. In Software Visualization (VISSOFT), 2013 First IEEE Working Conference on, pages 1-4. IEEE, 2013. [ bib | .pdf ]
Data visualisation with high expressive power plays an important role in code comprehension. Recent visualisation tools try to fulfill the expectations of the users and use various analogies. For example, in an architectural metaphor, each class is represented by a building. Buildings are grouped into districts according to the structure of the namespaces. We think that these unique ways of code representation have great potential, but in our opinion they use very simple graphical techniques (shapes, figures, low resolution) to visualise the structure of the source code. On the other hand, computer games use high quality graphic and have high expressive power. A good example is Minecraft, a popular role playing game that supports both high definition, photorealistic textures and long range 3D scene displaying. Additionally, it provides great extensibility and interactivity for third party software. In this paper, we introduce our mission to create a virtual world of source code in which developers and other stakeholders could explore and evaluate their project collaboratively in a virtual Minecraft world. Code properties are represented by graphical primitives offered by the game engine, and various interactivity features are planned. Besides challenges of the implementation there are some fundamental research issues considering the selection of a set of visual elements and mapping to source code properties. These elements have to be compatible not only with the visualisation and with the data model but also with the thinking of developers.